See contacts who have Starling


#1

Would be nice to have a contacts feature in the payment tab where you can see all your friends who already have a Starling Account, and from there just select someone to send money. (Without entering sort code and account). Those who don’t have Starling could receive a message with a link to receive the money and also inviting them to Starling if they wish.( Nice way to spread the word about the app)


#2

Given the consternation some people had over the displaying part of their telephone number on the Settle Up confirmation screen, this idea is just not going to fly.

Too many privacy concerns I reckon. Although a way around that will be for the app to include the ability to opt in/out of the lookup directory.


#3

It shouldn’t cause a concern with privacy since you should will only see friends who already are in your phone contacts list, meaning you already have their numbers.
I’m not suggesting a lookup directory, but a list of your contacts only.
Something similar works in Revolut.


#4

Monzo also seem to do the same. I can see who in my contacts are already Monzo and pay them quickly. I don’t see any more details about them than I already know a contacts on my phone.


#5

Fire also do the same


#6

I agree, with a mobile-only banking app, I thought this would have been a basic requirement.


#7

Sorry, no, I’m strongly against this and would think twice about remaining a customer if it was implemented. My friends and contacts (some of whom are not friends, but business-related or others) do not need to know who I bank with, and I am not in the habit of sharing that kind of information unnecessarily.

By all means make it optional - and by that I mean opt-in, not opt-out - but if enabled by default you increase the risk of phishing attempts, however small that incremental risk is.


#8

100% agree


#9

There are no privacy issues with this. How is it any different to your friends seeing which car you drive, or which supermarket you shop at?


#10

Apples and oranges.

Most of my friends don’t know what car I drive or where I shop unless I tell them. And even if I did it doesn’t make much difference; if someone knows where I bank, that’s information that could be used in phishing attempts.

Yes, I know it’s only a small risk. But 90% of the people in my contacts list will never need to know my bank. It’s information about me that I should be able to choose to share or not.


#11

I take your point about phishing.


#12

Anything that exposes information about someone that is outside of their control is a potential privacy issue. Privacy is a sensitive, complex and subjective subject - like with most of the features, additions, etc. Within Starling all that’s required is the ability to enable/disable based on personal preference.


#13

Really interesting conversation this…

Definitely reckon this should be opt-in only - if we should have it all.


#14

I don’t personally see the harm in it; although I can see why some would have an issue with this, opt-in is probably the way to go with this as it would please both camps.


#15

That’s privacy concern going a bit over the top! 100% of our phone contacts probably have our phone number. A much more sensitive data then the name of the bank you use.


#16

Sure, maybe. But I chose to give them my phone number. I didn’t choose to give them my bank.


#17

It’s the same as Facebook, WhatsApp and any other social app that uses your contacts list. Some people have privacy concerns, I don’t, but I respect those who do, and a simple opt-in (not opt-out) should make everyone happy. I’m happy to flick a switch for this feature.


#18

To make everyone happy then it could be set up like Settle Up. It would only work for those who opt in and register for the option to have direct payment to/from friends. How would you like that?


#19

Opt-in is always good for things like this. I think @Henry_Lee nailed it.


#20

I disagree - it’s the combination and gathering of small bits of “insignificant” data that lead to people giving away their bank passwords or transferring money to fraudsters as they are tricked into believing that if someone knows that much about them that they must be a legitimate caller.