#NoHiddenFigures


#1

Hi everyone,

I know that you’re keen to hear about more of the things we’re working on here at Starling, and I realise we’ve not shared our latest campaign, #NoHiddenFigures, with you yet! So, I thought I’d take the opportunity to do that.

The campaign focuses on talking openly about what we earn and what we spend. We believe that having this financial confidence allows us all to succeed - reaching for that next pay rise or promotion and understanding each others financial situation.

Read more about it and see some of the statistics in this blog post:

The campaign also included a series of videos which are now showing in cinemas across the South East. Have any of you seen one of these?

We’d love to hear your thoughts on this one too. Are you comfortable talking about money - perhaps only with certain people - or not at all? For me, there’s some really surprising stats so I’d love to know what you think.


Community Feedback
#3

This will be interesting. I only share my financial information with my partner (absolutely 100%) and my financial advisor (also 100%). Not family, friends or the lady in the Post Office queue. I have never been much interested in what others earn and cannot see that anyone would be much interested in my position as a retired person. R-


#4

I’ve never had a major problem with talking about what I spend - Although I can’t say I actively instigate that conversation many times.

Talking about what I earn? That’s a different matter.

I’m not sure I see any real value in discussing that, unless it’s with people doing the same job, in the same company (or even same job and different company).

I would have thought it would create the potential for more harm than good?


#5

Seen these ads while I was in the cinema for Antman and the Wasp. :slight_smile:


#6

I heard about this on the 11FS podcast. I find it interesting that even with the taboo subject of mental health, talking about money is well below that. Saying that, hardly anyone knows what my bank balance is!


#7

Ooh. I didn’t realise it was mentioned on 11FS. Which episode?


#8

The latest - released on Monday.


#9

Yep, episode 241


#10

Woah.

Let’s reverse up here.

20% of people don’t feel comfortable discussing their age with close friends?

Surely to God they’re not close friends then? That’s like the basics.

I share everything with close friends; they’re close friends…

I don’t see why close friends would have an issue knowing what I earn, they tell me what they earn, I tell them.

I don’t tend to tell colleagues though; that’s when problems start.


#11

None of my friends know my exact age. I literally didn’t know how old i was until a few months back :see_no_evil:

I know when i was born obv, and some of them know my DOB so could work out, but everyone around me was instructed some years back, well, when i got near to the birthday after 29, that all mention of my age was to stop. It’s been so many years now i genuinely didn’t know my exact age until i saw it on a form lol!


#12

It’s very clear, from reading of the fears and anxieties expressed by many new account holders, that the day-to-day challenges of handling personal finances shouldn’t be understated.

The lack of understanding around overdrafts, loans, management of regular payments to mention but a few, says a lot about how ill-prepared many are as they join the ranks of the “now it’s down to you”.

For that reason, I’m all for sharing ideas, without talking down. Good practice, examples of what not to do, and genuine questions about accessing the market place are each great sources of help.

Talking about what one earns?
I don’t get who that helps. Unless bragging about tax bands does it for you. I’m not even sure why I’d discuss it with close friends.

What I spend it on?
That’s different - that can be interesting (as long as it’s not a narrative littered with “Faberge” or “Gucci” or “Lamborghini”).

The videos?
It took me a couple of viewings to get the relevance of some of the words on the different models. I’m not really a fan, to be honest, it seemed a tad obscure. Perhaps the vivid images overwhelmed the messages? Not sure…


#13

I have no qualms talking about what I earn. Everyone I work with knows what I earn (roughly) as we’re within the NHS and therefore payscales are fairly standardised.

My issue with regards to openly talking about my spending lies with the fact that I am aware I live, largely and comfortably, from payslip to payslip enjoying my life with a sensible (I.e. at least one month) buffer. A buffer I would like to increase, nonetheless.

The idea is that we should save and save and save. A lot has happened in my relatively short (24 years!) life that you never know whether the excessive saving is worth it for the benefit of having fun all through the month.


#15

I have seen this advert in a cinema in Esher!

I have always found it odd how it is considered rude to talk about how much somebody earns.


#17

Oh dear, my (undoctored) screenshot of the advert was removed here for being offensive (not even hidden, totally removed!) - if it’s that bad it should have been caught before it was shown in cinemas :smile_cat:


#18

Frankly, this seems like a waste of time and effort. I can’t see what the videos can possibly accomplish and moreover, they are very dull. While I can see merit in, say, married couples being very open about money with one another, I see no advantage to discussing it with other people.


#19

I would prefer to see dad bods represented and elderly ladies rather than these models. If you’re representing financial confidence with body confidence then I don’t want to see models that make average people feel less confident


#20

Does Starling Bank talk openly with its employees about what everyone else in the company earns?


#21

Yeah I’m not really understanding this whole campaign to be honest. There’s some things that are just not polite conversation; salary, savings, syphilis.


#22

:joy:

Let’s hope you have plenty of just two of these things!


#23

Isn’t that the point though? To start a discussion on whether they should be. I’d much rather give strangers the ins and outs of my financial situation any day than hear absolutely anything about their children. Unless they’re my children (I have none… as if you couldn’t tell lol) I find it rude and objectionable having to look at photos of ugly babies i don’t know, look at crappy drawn pictures where you’ve no idea what’s being shown, or tales of what lovely Petunia-Grace got in her SATs tests. Couldn’t give a flying fig. You really shouldn’t have to put up with it in polite conversation when you have no interest, or no reason to care. But for some reason British society (because its not like this in many countries) has decided that one is no go, which arguably is why most people are so bad when it comes to finances… because we don’t talk about it, but i have to stand there and fake enthusiasm and listen to a whole load of BS about someone else’s child, as if the fact that they managed to produce offspring, and one that can vaguely function as a human being, is something i would ever want to know.

The whole point of the campaign was to stimulate a discussion and it’s doing that, even if it is a general “god no, i’d never tell people my finances”, but to come back to my earlier point, as a nation we are pretty shocking with finances, and they started introducing finance as part of PSE when i was just leaving school well over 2 decades ago, and i have no idea if they’re still doing it or dropped it, and if it makes any difference at all. It would be interesting to see if Monzo’s Millennials and Gen Z customer base would have the same reaction as here, or if younger people are more open with finances like they are many other aspects of life.